+39 02 8718 8553 sales@tanaza.com

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Tanaza features a splash page editor that allows in few minutes the WiFi network administrator to create and customise the authentication page of a public hotspot. In this article, you will find the 4 rules to create an effective splash page for your WiFi users in order to leverage your WiFi network.

 

Easy and fast access to the WiFi network

When users visualise the splash page, you have a few seconds to convince them to log in. Accessing your public hotspot should not require too many efforts otherwise, you are taking the risk to loose potential WiFi users.

The best way to obtain an effective splash page is to make it simple and easy to use.

 

Don’t add too many items, focus on the essential

When creating a splash page, be careful not to confound simplicity with shortage otherwise, you could lose WiFi users with too many information on the landing page. This happens because we don’t respect a few design rules.

But which are these four design rules for an effective splash page?

 

1. Do not add too much content to the WiFi splash page

Less is more is the universal good design rule.

By putting just a few contents in the splash page you allow them to focus on the essentials items and you make the UI intuitive and immediate. When users click on your WiFi network name to access the internet, they expect a fast and easy way to log in.

Instead, they often deal with too complex pages, with too much information, which makes the login process too long and complex.

Add to the WiFi splash page only the essential items: logo, a welcome text, a few login methods. If you need users to accept your terms and conditions, ask your legal consultant to reduce the amount of text to a minimum (eventually link to the full text of terms and conditions).

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

 

 

2. Use a few colours in your WiFi splash page
 The human mind needs time to elaborate the information, and this takes some effort. A splash page with five colours is more complex to understand than one with just one or two colours. Using a few colours, you allow users to relax and focus, making the WiFi access easier.

Choose monochromatic backgrounds or simple images, with just a few items and a uniform colour set. If you use many login methods (e.g. three social login methods) reduce the amount of space that each button takes, so that the page is less coloured.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

3. Focus the attention on key elements

To make your splash page more intuitive, use some tricks to focus users on the most important elements.

 

Use the advertising tool to publish ads on your WiFi splash page

Use the Tanaza advertising tool to show advertising banners and videos. This way, you will focus your users’ attention on the show!

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Use bold for titles

Help users to quickly examine the content in your page. Bold your titles (the most important message) and eventually complete the message with a normally formatted text. Using bold titles helps users read your message and login instructions.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Put some space between the elements

As in a book, distinguish the various elements in the splash page with some space and interline. Using white space helps to focus the users’ attention on single elements, such as your logo, text, or buttons.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Use images with a clear meaning

Don’t use images as a decoration, instead choose images that reflect the message you want to send and your brand image. Or, use them to drive emotions (e.g. the image of a smile, or a sunset).

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

4. Make your Wifi login page accessible

Make your WiFi splash page easy to access for anyone. Small text fonts, clear colours, or small buttons (hard to click from mobile devices) make the login experience too complex for someone.

How to make a WiFi splash page accessible?

 

Make the text readable

Use a larger font size, at least 20pt. Don’t try to be original by using complex font, for example, a font simulating handwriting, as they are less easy to read and less intuitive.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Create some contrast

Use a clear colour for text on a dark background, or the opposite. Create contrast by making the whole page clearer or darker and don’t use coloured rectangles under the text.

Create contrast between elements: if you use blue login buttons, use a red or yellow background.

image6

Move buttons to the bottom

Make the experience better for mobile device users. Put the elements at the bottom by using the footer component in the Tanaza splash page editor, you’ll make the click from mobile devices easier.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Offer a way-out

If you use a social login method, offer an alternative method of authentication via email. Not all people have a social account or want to use it; some might prefer the email, instead.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Conclusion

Creating an effective splash page is not hard. Do not fill it with stuff: use just a few images, a few colours, a small amount of text and a few login methods.

Focus the attention on the key elements and make the UI simple, by using less colours. Make it also accessible, by using a large font size, contract, and moving buttons to the bottom.

If you want to collect users’ data through WiFi, use social login together with another authentication method such as the email login.

If you want to comment on this article, for example by adding your own examples of splash pages, we’ll be happy to provide some feedback!

What WiFi hotspot growth means for your business

What WiFi hotspot growth means for your business

Business man uses wifi hotspot to growth his business

The world is quietly experiencing a “hotspot revolution.” Since 2015, the world’s total count of public WiFi hotspots has grown exponentially. A Cisco research found 64.2 million public hotspots operating at the end of 2015. And this growth is accelerating—by the end of 2022, Cisco projects 432.5 million global public hotspots.

Thanks to near-ubiquitous public WiFi, on-demand connectivity is no longer seen as a convenience or privilege. Just as you’d expect to find running water in every public bathroom you visit, you’re entitled to expect publicly accessible WiFi for your laptop or mobile device.

GM, an American automaker, includes optional WiFi data plans in many new vehicles. Comcast, an American telecom provider, is using its millions of home wireless routers to build a massive WiFi hotspot network accessible to anyone with a Comcast account. Cafes without WiFi are now virtually unheard of. Add to that the fact that potentially signing up to use a hotspot over registering for your own WiFi account in the US might be cheaper, and hotspots might just be the solution to the American internet provider problem.

Simply put, it’s impossible to ignore the incredible rate of WiFi hotspot growth and the public’s dramatically escalating standards for convenient access. Here are four potential takeaways for your business.

 

How WiFi hotspots can benefit your business

WiFi isn’t just for cafes and train stations

There was a time when WiFi was a novelty that could only be found at coffee shops and major public gathering places, such as transit hubs and city parks. But that hasn’t been the case for some time. In the past several years, WiFi has morphed from a value-added customer perk to a must-have feature for virtually any business with any sort of public space component.

Here’s a small sampling of the myriad uses for public WiFi in various economic niches:

  • Retail. In-store WiFi access points provide on-demand access for prospective customers as they browse inventory, allowing for easy price comparisons, photography, and peer consultations. Retailers with mobile pay platforms can capture more revenue with mobile “buy now” buttons that finalize sales before prospects leave the store.
  • Healthcare. Patients and their family members can spend significant amounts of time waiting for appointments and news in public spaces. WiFi in waiting rooms allows these people to stay connected during those long, often tedious periods. Likewise, patients well enough to surf the Internet (and allowed to use computing devices) appreciate on-demand access in hospital rooms and wards.
  • Hospitality. Hotels have turned the corner toward free, on-demand public WiFi in all public spaces, including lobbies, restaurants, lounges, conference areas, gyms, pools, and outdoor gathering places. For many hotels, guests and their associates represent a huge captive audience that may be receptive to branded marketing, such as ads for the hotel bar’s happy hour and room discounts for longer stays.
  • Transportation. Public WiFi is a natural fit in airports, train stations, bus depots, public plazas, and even trains and buses. Many cities have deployed public WiFi networks in underground rapid transit stations, subway cars, and other transit vehicles as well, creating new advertising bandwidth that complements existing billboard and wall ads in these places. And like hotels, airports’ gate areas boast massive captive audiences and dozens—or hundreds—of nearby businesses that could potentially market their services. Plus, airports are big places. To properly accommodate demand, airport restaurants, cafes, and lounges all need their own APs—a major opportunity for enterprising resellers willing to play in the transportation segment.
  • Education. Many university campuses are now fully covered by public WiFi networks, to the point where institutions that have yet to deploy campus-wide WiFi are viewed as laggards. Though data remains limited on this point, it’s conceivable that a lack of public WiFi could affect student enrollment decisions.
  • Sport. From youth facilities to professional arenas, sporting environments offer a rich opportunity for WiFi resellers. Fans snap pictures, share social status updates, and browse for information at incredible rates. What’s more, captive, often festive fans comprise an airport-scale audience that’s receptive to targeted marketing.

This stunning diversity of WiFi use represents a tremendous opportunity for entrepreneurs who resell WiFi services and maintain APs. As public WiFi migrates from “optional expense” to “overhead cost” on ever more balance sheets in ever more niches, more use cases are sure to emerge. And that promises to make it easier than ever to sell operators on the benefits of onsite hotspots.

 

Social Engagement Is Exploding

According to Hootsuite, in 2018 the 88% of Facebook users accessed the platform via mobile device, and 95% of Facebook visits were made on smartphones and tablets. Only 31.8% of visits were made on desktops or laptops. And Facebook is just one example of the clear-as-day nexus between mobile devices and social media. Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and various regional social networks have become mobile forces to be reckoned with.

Much of this exploding social engagement is happening on public WiFi networks, as mobile users visit retailers’ websites, check in at cafes or restaurants, share pictures of merchandise with friends, or simply call out a venue in a social post.

As WiFi hotspot access grows, users will become increasingly accustomed to accessing social media via public WiFi—and thus for late-adopting clients to see the value of offering WiFi access to the general public. Clients can and should provide social login capabilities on their customized splash pages, allowing visitors to log into the network using their Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn,  or even VKontakte accounts. Every visitor who completes the social login process provides valuable demographic and contact information, opening up onsite and future marketing opportunities.

 

Demand for Premium WiFi Has Never Been Higher

Now that public WiFi is a necessity for businesses and institutions looking to remain competitive, it’s natural to assume that individual users—clients and customers—are no longer willing to pay for it. This is certainly true in fragmented markets, such as food service, where customers can easily leave an outlet that charges for WiFi and walk down the street to a competitor that does not.

But it’s not true everywhere. Captive customers, such as sports fans and air travelers, are still willing to pay for basic WiFi. More importantly, affluent customers and those who aren’t personally footing the bill for their data usage (such as business travellers with expense accounts) are willing to pay for higher tiers of WiFi service, notably in crowded environments with limited bandwidth. Hotels, convention centres, and transport nodes are particularly well-suited for tiered or premium WiFi services, which offer an additional opportunity for clients to monetize their networks and APs.

There may even be opportunity for downmarket clients: According to a Cisco white paper, Canadian coffee-and-donuts chain Tim Hortons provides faster connection speeds, an abbreviated sign-in process, and unlimited data use for customers who provided detailed demographic information at first login.

 

WiFi Roaming Offers New Data Capture Opportunities

The same Cisco white paper outlines an additional opportunity to forge new revenue streams from the ongoing hotspot revolution: WiFi roaming.

Like cellular roaming, WiFi roaming allows mobile users access to public hotspots (or home hotspots with public-facing access, such as the public-private network Comcast is currently planning) under other carriers’ purview. Many carriers now offer roaming arrangements, often on an international scale, for a fixed monthly fee. According to Cisco, “The ultimate goal is to make WiFi roaming as smooth and easy to use as the [cellular] network.”

As WiFi roaming becomes a standard component of mobile service, costs are likely to drop, enticing more mobile users to take advantage of the service and connect to out-of-network WiFi hotspots that they might previously have avoided. Every user who does so creates a new opportunity for WiFi clients to monetize their APs—particularly if they use a customized splash page with social sign-in capabilities to capture valuable data from prospective customers. Captured data from previously unreachable customers is an enticing prospect for advertisers—one that WiFi resellers would be advised to hit hard and often when describing the benefits of public WiFi to prospective clients.

 

Final Thoughts

It’s no longer debatable: The hotspot revolution is irreversible. For businesses with any sort of public space component, the situation demands an urgent, focused response. Lost time could equal lost revenue—and, perhaps, a permanent loss of market share to competitors quicker to embrace the power of public WiFi.

The good news is that the hotspot revolution creates a tremendous opportunity for entrepreneurs who recognize the potential of cloud-managed WiFi networks. With public WiFi no longer an optional perk for businesses that want to remain competitive, the concept nearly sells itself. All you need to make your cloud-managed WiFi business work is a clear vision and a willingness to put in the necessary work.

If you need a software to easily set up and manage your wireless networks, Tanaza offers the best-in-class cloud-based software for WiFi network and social hotspot management. Its Hotspot System allows WiFi network administrators to set up and configure a captive portal for their public hotspots, which can be easily customized with Tanaza’s splash page editor. Through the captive portal, WiFi users can authenticate using their personal credentials (such as their email or phone number) or their preferred social networking account (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn…). Businesses that provide WiFi to their clients can leverage the captive portal as an advertising tool, by inserting image or video advertisement directly on the splash page, and as a marketing tool by collecting useful WiFi user data and segmenting it for marketing purposes. By integrating Tanaza with third-party applications, businesses can use the data collected to communicate information via targeted email marketing campaigns and to interact with users with engaging content that will be seen by them during the authentication process.

 

Published by Claudia Barbarisi, written by Flynn Robinson.
Flynn is a self-employed writer and programmer, whose days generally involve a coffee shop or two with excellent, free WiFi.

The next steps of the WiFi4EU programme

The next steps of the WiFi4EU programme

Modem Libero - WiFi 4EU Update

After the cancellation of the first call, put out by the European Commission on May 15th, the tender for WiFi4EU – the initiative promoted by the European Union for the diffusion of free WiFi connection in public spaces –  officially reopened on November 7th at 13:00 CET, and closed on November 9th at 17:00 CET. Although, three more calls will be published over the next two years, about one every six months.

>> Find out more about WiFi4EU in our previous article

 

The reasons behind the first WiFi4EU call cancellation

The first call was extensively popular, but due to technical issues (a flaw that allowed some municipalities to apply before the call was opened while preventing others to do the same once the call had opened), the WiFi4EU portal was closed a few hours after.

Once the call reopened, all registrations already completed were still valid and registered municipalities were able to apply again with a click of a button. Over 13,000 municipalities registered to the call in order to become eligible for the grants.

If as a municipality, you applied during the canceled call and you want to check whether your application has been kept valid, just enter the WiFi4EU portal with your own credentials.

>>Watch our free webinar about WiFi4EU

 

Winners’ announcement and next steps

The winners will be announced approximately six weeks after the closing of the competition; subsequently, the selected municipalities will receive an email with the request to sign a grant agreement.

Update: the list of the 2,800 municipalities that won the first call has been published on the WiFi4EU portal on December 7th. A total of 42 millions in funds have been allocated for the first call.

>>Read the official announcement and see the list of winners of the first WiFi4EU call by country.

The projects are declared to be selected on a first-come-first-served basis, as each member state will have a limited amount of vouchers (around 2,500) available to give out to deploy free wireless internet access points.

Each voucher is meant to cover the equipment and installation costs (CAPEX) of the Wi-Fi hotspots, up to a maximum of 15,000 euros: if the costs exceed this amount, the difference will be paid by the beneficiary. Other costs, such as subscriptions, maintenance, and the cost for internet connection, are on the municipality itself and cannot be covered with the European Funds.

The beneficiaries of a voucher will have a year and a half to install and operate the hotspots, selecting the public spaces that will be equipped with WiFi and contracting the equipment installation to one or more suppliers. After the hotspot deployment, the municipalities must guarantee free WiFi for at least three years. The voucher assigned to a municipality must be collected by a single supplier, and cannot be split among multiple suppliers.

Municipalities will choose their suppliers of WiFi hardware and installation services from a selected list of suppliers, which is already published on the WiFi4EU portal.

Tanaza is in this list and provides its WiFi services across all the EU member countries, through its extensive network of authorized partners.

 

How to apply to the next WiFi4EU calls

Even if the first call is now closed, it will be possible for municipalities to register for the upcoming ones.
Municipalities and local institutions intending to take part in this project must register on the WiFi4EU portal to be promptly informed about the timing of the request.

The application will need to be accompanied by the «proof of approval» from the legal representative of the institution, from the copy of the act with which he was nominated and his ID card.

 

The future of WiFi4EU

After the announced calls, the second phase of the WiFi4EU scheme (due to start in 2019) will be about making remote monitoring and seamless login available across all the deployed networks. The plan is to introduce a single authentication and authorization platform that allows users to register their credentials and seamlessly roam between WiFi4EU hotspots, without having to constantly log in or to sign up to new hotspots.

Moreover, there will be a remote monitoring system that will ensure that all networks are up and running during the 3-year period; through this platform, the Commission will be also able to remotely monitor the connectivity quality of all the WiFi4EU hotspots.

Collect more WiFi user data through social login and custom forms

cover-blog-article (1)

Tanaza has developed a feature to help WiFi network administrators collect additional custom WiFi user data in addition to the data already collected with authentication methods like social login, like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.

Once collected, this data can easily be leveraged to execute in-target marketing campaigns, such as email marketing.

 

Why is it important to collect WiFi user data

Once a user logs into a network using a popular authentication method like social login, the system collects personalized data about the WiFi user, like their gender, age, name, surname, email address, location to name a few. However, since social media platforms have adopted strict policies for user data protection, users can now customize their profiles’ visibility and can choose to keep private the personal information on their social media profiles.

As a result, Tanaza has combined two existing authentication methods to compensate for the lack of data provided by having just one. This latest update known as pre-filled form-based authentication provides a system that allows network administrators to request additional information about their WiFi users by enabling custom form authentication after social login that users must fill in before connecting to the WiFi network.

 

How to implement this feature in a public WiFi network

Collect more WiFi user data through social login and custom forms

To collect more specific data about WiFi users, aside from the one collected with initial authentication method (i.e. social login), WiFi network administrator can simply enable custom form authentication, which consists on asking the users to fill in a custom form to complete the login, as seen on the image below of the Tanaza splash page editor’s Advanced Settings for Facebook Social Login.

This pre-filled form-based authentication is a handy captive portal configuration in public networks located in places like retail stores, supermarkets or educational institutes. By requesting a student number or a fidelity card number, the WiFi network administrator can be offer targeted discounts and share information tailored to the user. What is more, this tool can also serve as a verification system in order to identify that the user is a real user, using their personal phone number.

 

Thanks to the data retrieved from the WiFi user’s social profile (if its privacy setting allows that) and the information collected using the custom form, WiFi professionals can run various types of targeted marketing campaigns.

 

Check out a short GIF of the login process below:

Hello

Schedule a demo

Users can now see their WiFi voucher usage data

Users can now see their WiFi voucher usage data

View Usage of Coupon

Thanks to Tanaza’s captive portal, WiFi network administrators can enable multiple authentication methods for users to log into a public network.  WiFi vouchers is just one of the many authentication available.

Recently, Tanaza’s couponing system feature was updated so that WiFi network administrators could enable users to see details regarding the usage of their WiFi vouchers once they’ve logged in to the network using a coupon code.

The couponing system feature allows network administrators to distribute WiFi vouchers to configure a coupon template, set a data limit, a quota limit, a duration, add an expiration date, and enable the “stop and resume” option. Thanks to the latest update of the feature, the network administrator can now also choose whether or not to show its WiFi user detailed data about their voucher usage.

 

view voucher usage dataEnable coupon data usage on your splash page

In order to use this latest update and share data with the users, the WiFi network administrator must enabled this update within the couponing system feature. Once enabled and the user authenticates using the WiFi voucher, they are shown detailed data about their voucher usage, such as:

  • Voucher name
  • Total session time available
  • Consumed session time
  • Download quota
  • Upload quota
  • Number of devices connected

 

>> See how to enable this update on your SSID

 

Furthermore, This feature can be leveraged for both new WiFi users and for returning WiFi users, thanks to Tanaza’s remember me feature that automatically logs in users who have previously logged on to the network.

 

Practical cases for this feature update:

New users

Once they input the coupon code, new WiFi users will be shown the usage data (if enabled) the network administrator chooses to display and will then be redirected to a landing page.

Returning users (with welcome back splash page)

The Tanaza remember me feature allows returning users to automatically login to a WiFi network without the authentication process. A welcome back splash page will be displayed (as seen in the image above) automatically showing data about the voucher previously used to authenticate,  the returning user will be able to see usage data,such as session time and the remaining upload and download quota. The welcome back splash page will not require re-authentication and will give users the option to choose when to connect by simply clicking on the connect button which will redirect them to a landing page, or to request to be forgotten if they wish to use another login method or another coupon to access the network.  

Related articles:

Paid WiFi: how to configure a couponing system

https://www.tanaza.com/tanazaclassic/blog/monetize-your-wi-fi-paid-wi-fi-couponing-wi-fi-high-roi-wi-fi/

4 ways to leverage your WiFi landing page

4 ways to leverage your WiFi landing page

4 ways to leverage your splash page

Tanaza features a captive portal, allowing WiFi network administrators to create and customise splash page for public hotspots.
Indeed, Tanaza splash page editor gives the opportunity to owners of a venue to promote and deliver additional services to WiFi users.


There are many ways to leverage the splash page of a public hotspot, such as for example encourage WiFi users to download an application, leave a TripAdvisor review, follow a Facebook page or redirect them to another website.

 

Download an application on the WiFi landing page

 

WiFi network administrators can encourage WiFi users to download an iOS or Android application before accessing a public hotspot, which is really useful when managing WiFi hotspots in locations like museums, restaurant chains, shopping malls, sports venues, municipalities, private medical centers, fashion retail shops, furniture shops, shopping outlets, supermarkets and so on.

By simply creating a redirection button to the download platform of an app (iTunes Store for iOS or Google Play Store Android) on the Tanaza splash page, a hotspot administrator can redirect WiFi users and offer them additional services. For example, a museum could promote its audio-guide application on its splash page, a restaurant could promote its “take-away” service application and a brand could promote its e-commerce app to people that are in its fashion retail shop.

>> Read this article for more information

 

Increase the social visibility of your location through Tripadvisor

 

Tanaza allows restaurant owners to increase their visibility on review platforms such as Tripadvisor, Zomato, Yelp, etc. Indeed, WiFi network administrators can customise the splash page, adding a redirection button or image to the restaurant TripAdvisor page.
The idea is to encourage clients to leave a review about their experience in exchange for free WiFi. Another marketing idea could be to ask for a review on Tripadvisor in exchange for a free café for example.

>> Read this article for more information

 

Engage with customers thanks to Facebook Like and Check-in

When accessing a WiFi network, users have often the possibility to connect using their social media account such as Facebook. In this case, a WiFi network administrator could ask them to like a page or to geolocate themselves in a location on Facebook. This allows the owner of a venue to increase his social visibility and to engage with more customers.
To do this, simply enable the option “social actions” on the splash page settings.

4 ways to leverage your splash page with Tanaza

We recommend you to ask whether for a Like or a Check-in to WiFi users.
Indeed, there are three options when using social actions with the Tanaza hotspot system:

  • the first one is the Like only;
  • the second one is the Check-in only;
  • the third one is asking for a Like and a Check-in to WiFi users;

One possible scenario is that the user is asked for a “Like”, then connects to the internet. When connecting the second time to the network, depending on the settings, he’s asked again for the “Like” (if not done) or he’s asked for a check-in in a specific place.
Find more information about how you should communicate about social actions in this article.

>> Read this article for more information

 

Use an external WiFi splash page to offer additional login services

 

Tanaza allows WiFi network administrators to configure an external splash page and deliver additional services to WiFi users y adding an external radius server on top of the Tanaza infrastructure. This function is really useful in scenarios like in a supermarket, where the WiFi administrator sets up the social login or a login through a fidelity card.

Also, the external splash page can be used when WiFi administrators want to enable their own splash page or SMS gateway different from the Tanaza’s one.

>> Read this article for more information

 

To conclude, customising the splash page of a public hotspot is a fundamental step in the communication and marketing plan of any businesses willing to promote and deliver additional services to their customers. It allows businesses to offset costs of the WiFi infrastructure but also to enhance the final experience of their users.

Related articles:

WiFi advertising: how to leverage WiFi networks in public places

Why you should not ask for both Like and Check-in Facebook login page

https://www.tanaza.com/tanazaclassic/blog/collect-email-addresses-tanaza/