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Tanaza released new templates for the splash page editor

Tanaza features a splash page editor that allows WiFi professionals to configure, edit, and customise their captive portal.

The editor’s drag and drop system enables WiFi network administrators to create in a few clicks their splash page by adding a logo, a text, their preferred authentication methods, and redirection links to external landing pages, to name a few. The landing page can also be configured in multiple languages.

>> Watch our video tutorial!

In the past, many of our customers have asked for our help when building their splash page – mostly for tips and tactics on how best to engage their WiFi users. With this in mind, we recently released new templates on the splash page editor to help get them started and give them some inspiration.

In addition to this, we also recently published an article about the four rules to follow when creating a landing page.

These models show you pre-designed splash pages, mobile friendly, that you can easily modify by substituting the elements with your logo, image, text and so on.

When opening the splash page editor, click on “Create new”, and choose the template you like the most for your WiFi hotspot.
We created different models for  different sectors/markets where public WiFi is often provided, such as healthcare, entertainment venues, public transportation, education, catering trade, commercial venues and hospitality.

 

If you would like to test the Tanaza splash page editor, you can register to our 15 days free trial.

WiFi 4 and WiFi 5 are the new simplified naming protocols for wireless standards

The WiFi alliance recently announced a change in the names for the IEEE 802.11 wireless standards, the specifications composed of a set of protocols determine the technology requirements of wireless networks. Since the IEEE 802.11 generations of WiFi technology are so popular and similarly named, to avoid confusion the Wi-Fi alliance has decided to appoint simpler names.

 

Simplifying the technical names of wireless standards 

 

For anyone who has no previous WiFi knowledge and has ever tried to purchase a WiFi device, understanding the different generations of WiFi technology within the device can be a real struggle. These technical names composed of a long set of numbers followed by random letters seem nonsensical to anyone not proficient in WiFi terminology, making it difficult to decipher what the different letters are actually referring to.

 

Why is this change happening?

 

The re-brand of these alphanumeric codes will serve to help consumers make more informed decisions about the networks they are connecting to. Namely with popular wireless standards like 802.11n and 802.11ac which are some of the most commonly used, especially used when implementing home and office networks. By renaming these technologies, the WiFi Alliance is replacing these alphanumeric codes for single digit numbers that represent the ranking of each WiFi technology – i.e. WiFi 4 or WiFi 5.

 

From now on, the standard 802.11ac, will be called Wi-Fi 5 as it is the fifth version of IEEE 802.11 Wi-Fi generation. Consequently, 802.11n (also sometimes known as Wireless N), will be known as Wi-Fi 4 as it is a lower version of the 802.11ac standard and the fourth version to be developed.
By shortening and simplifying these technical names, users will have a much easier time understanding the hierarchy between the different version. Indeed, the higher the version number, the higher the generation of WiFi technology – vis a vis, most upgraded, in terms of speed, signal, bandwidth.

 

Although not yet officially announced, the latest generation of Wi-Fi technology – 802.11ax will soon be denoted WiFi 6.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Tanaza features a splash page editor that allows in few minutes the WiFi network administrator to create and customise the authentication page of a public hotspot. In this article, you will find the 4 rules to create an effective splash page for your WiFi users in order to leverage your WiFi network.

 

Easy and fast access to the WiFi network

When users visualise the splash page, you have a few seconds to convince them to log in. Accessing your public hotspot should not require too many efforts otherwise, you are taking the risk to loose potential WiFi users.

The best way to obtain an effective splash page is to make it simple and easy to use.

 

Don’t add too many items, focus on the essential

When creating a splash page, be careful not to confound simplicity with shortage otherwise, you could lose WiFi users with too many information on the landing page. This happens because we don’t respect a few design rules.

But which are these four design rules for an effective splash page?

 

1. Do not add too much content to the WiFi splash page

Less is more is the universal good design rule.

By putting just a few contents in the splash page you allow them to focus on the essentials items and you make the UI intuitive and immediate. When users click on your WiFi network name to access the internet, they expect a fast and easy way to log in.

Instead, they often deal with too complex pages, with too much information, which makes the login process too long and complex.

Add to the WiFi splash page only the essential items: logo, a welcome text, a few login methods. If you need users to accept your terms and conditions, ask your legal consultant to reduce the amount of text to a minimum (eventually link to the full text of terms and conditions).

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

 

 

2. Use a few colours in your WiFi splash page
 The human mind needs time to elaborate the information, and this takes some effort. A splash page with five colours is more complex to understand than one with just one or two colours. Using a few colours, you allow users to relax and focus, making the WiFi access easier.

Choose monochromatic backgrounds or simple images, with just a few items and a uniform colour set. If you use many login methods (e.g. three social login methods) reduce the amount of space that each button takes, so that the page is less coloured.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

3. Focus the attention on key elements

To make your splash page more intuitive, use some tricks to focus users on the most important elements.

 

Use the advertising tool to publish ads on your WiFi splash page

Use the Tanaza advertising tool to show advertising banners and videos. This way, you will focus your users’ attention on the show!

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Use bold for titles

Help users to quickly examine the content in your page. Bold your titles (the most important message) and eventually complete the message with a normally formatted text. Using bold titles helps users read your message and login instructions.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Put some space between the elements

As in a book, distinguish the various elements in the splash page with some space and interline. Using white space helps to focus the users’ attention on single elements, such as your logo, text, or buttons.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Use images with a clear meaning

Don’t use images as a decoration, instead choose images that reflect the message you want to send and your brand image. Or, use them to drive emotions (e.g. the image of a smile, or a sunset).

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

4. Make your Wifi login page accessible

Make your WiFi splash page easy to access for anyone. Small text fonts, clear colours, or small buttons (hard to click from mobile devices) make the login experience too complex for someone.

How to make a WiFi splash page accessible?

 

Make the text readable

Use a larger font size, at least 20pt. Don’t try to be original by using complex font, for example, a font simulating handwriting, as they are less easy to read and less intuitive.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Create some contrast

Use a clear colour for text on a dark background, or the opposite. Create contrast by making the whole page clearer or darker and don’t use coloured rectangles under the text.

Create contrast between elements: if you use blue login buttons, use a red or yellow background.

Move buttons to the bottom

Make the experience better for mobile device users. Put the elements at the bottom by using the footer component in the Tanaza splash page editor, you’ll make the click from mobile devices easier.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Offer a way-out

If you use a social login method, offer an alternative method of authentication via email. Not all people have a social account or want to use it; some might prefer the email, instead.

4 rules to build the perfect splash page for your WiFi hotspot

Conclusion

Creating an effective splash page is not hard. Do not fill it with stuff: use just a few images, a few colours, a small amount of text and a few login methods.

Focus the attention on the key elements and make the UI simple, by using less colours. Make it also accessible, by using a large font size, contract, and moving buttons to the bottom.

If you want to collect users’ data through WiFi, use social login together with another authentication method such as the email login.

If you want to comment on this article, for example by adding your own examples of splash pages, we’ll be happy to provide some feedback!

The 4 most requested features for WiFi professionals

The 4 more requested features for WiFi professionals

The WiFi technology is evolving fast (WiFi 5, also known as 802.11ac, and soon WiFi 6, also known as 802.11ax) and so are the needs of our partners. We at Tanaza are focused on our customers’ development and are thus choosing new features to develop according to their needs and the market.

In this article, we list the 4 most requested feature ideas under consideration to develop in the near future.
We strongly encourage you to upvote these features on our community website, success.tanaza.com.

 

Making our WiFi software compatible with 3G/4G devices

 

Supporting 3G and 4G devices with Tanaza software is one of the most requested features by our customers.

Many of our customers already use the workaround that suggests connecting the Tanaza powered access point to their 3G/4G device using an ethernet cable. Consider that this is only possible if both devices have an Ethernet port. Also, either for lack of fiber/DSL internet connection or for mobility requirements, an ethernet connection is sometimes not available.

By supporting 3G/4G devices, Tanaza customers could directly set up a captive portal on a SIM card, and manage networks remotely in many locations. This feature is particularly useful when working in the public transportation sector such as buses and trains.
For example, a travel company could equip their buses with 3G/4G devices and provide WiFi to their customers en route. The company could decide to offer the service for free or to create a paid WiFi hotspot.

To help its customers develop their project in the public transportation sector, Tanaza is considering to support medium-priced 3G/4G devices like the DLINK DWR 953 and DWR 921 that both use a sim card.

Possible scenario: a bus company equips their buses with 3G/4G devices and sets up a captive portal with coupon authentication. The first coupon offered is configured with a limited number of devices and a limited time session, but the service is offered free-of-charge.
WiFi users can decide to buy a second coupon to enjoy unlimited bandwidth and an unlimited time session on the WiFi network.

Integration of a self-service payment system (like PayPal) into the Tanaza splash page

 

Integrate a self-service payment system into the Tanaza splash page would simplify and expedite the process for WiFi solution providers of setting up a paid WiFi network.

Indeed, Tanaza already features a couponing system that allows online payment for WiFi users.

The current experience for the WiFi user is the following:

  1. The user clicks on the external link on the Tanaza splash page
  2. The user redirected to a payment webpage created by the WiFi network administrator
  3. The user purchases the coupon on this webpage and receives a code
  4. Once authenticated, the user must click on a link to get back to the Tanaza splash page.
  5. Finally, the user enters the coupon code on the Tanaza splash page to access to the internet.

On the other hand, by integrating a self-service payment system, like Paypal, directly into the Tanaza splash page, the WiFi network administrator would just have to add it to the splash page editor, configure the process coupon purchase process and deliver the password to the WiFi user. In this scenario, the experience of WiFi users would be simpler.

This feature is particularly useful for satellite providers, internet solution providers and wireless internet solution providers to monetize their WiFi infrastructures. For example, an integrated self-service payment system could allow satellite providers to easily sell internet access to WiFi solution providers and distribute WiFi in many places worldwide.

Integrate Tanaza WiFi with property management systems (PMS)

 

Tanaza has many customers working in the  hospitality sector where a couponing system is particularly needed. Tanaza features a couponing system that facilitates network deployment for hotel managers, especially when setting up different SSIDs and configuring bandwidth control per SSID, number of connected devices per person, number of concurrent users per SSID, customised password, time session and so on.

Nevertheless, hotel managers could further utilize their guest management system if they had the possibility to integrate Tanaza together with a property management system.

A property management system (or PMS) is a software application used to coordinate front office operational functions like sales and planning, guest bookings, guest information, online booking, room numbers, added services and so on.


By integrating a PMS together with Tanaza, hotel managers could check on a single platform details about individual guests together with the SSID they are connected to, the number of devices connected, the amount of bandwidth consumed etc. From a monitoring and management point of view, PMS and Tanaza could bring a real added-value to managers working in the hospitality sector.

Tanaza Hotspot system available without flashing on top of Ruckus and Aerohive devices

 

Tanaza recently developed the Tanaza hotspot system for Meraki Cisco users and is now thinking about developing the Tanaza hotspot system without flashing for Ruckus and Aerohive. The aim is to offer WiFi solution providers the possibility to work with enterprise-level hardware vendors, like Ruckus or Aerohive, and enjoy a full set of hotspot management features.

Moreover, compared to other WiFi hotspot software on the market, Tanaza does not set a limit per concurrent users of splash page views on a WiFi network, allowing WiFi professionals to fully leverage their public networks.

By integrating the Tanaza hotspot system without flashing, WiFi professionals could keep using their devices with the original network management system while configuring the hotspot part on the Tanaza cloud-based platform. Tanaza’s hotspot features include the splash page editor, the couponing system, the captive portal with different authentication methods, and the advertising tool, to name a few.

Related articles:

Users can now see their WiFi voucher usage data

Collect more WiFi user data through social login and custom forms

https://www.tanaza.com/blog/collect-verified-phone-numbers-from-wifi-users/

Collect more WiFi user data through social login and custom forms

Tanaza has developed a feature to help WiFi network administrators collect additional custom WiFi user data in addition to the data already collected with authentication methods like social login, like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.

Once collected, this data can easily be leveraged to execute in-target marketing campaigns, such as email marketing.

 

Why is it important to collect WiFi user data

Once a user logs into a network using a popular authentication method like social login, the system collects personalized data about the WiFi user, like their gender, age, name, surname, email address, location to name a few. However, since social media platforms have adopted strict policies for user data protection, users can now customize their profiles’ visibility and can choose to keep private the personal information on their social media profiles.

As a result, Tanaza has combined two existing authentication methods to compensate for the lack of data provided by having just one. This latest update known as pre-filled form-based authentication provides a system that allows network administrators to request additional information about their WiFi users by enabling custom form authentication after social login that users must fill in before connecting to the WiFi network.

 

How to implement this feature in a public WiFi network

To collect more specific data about WiFi users, aside from the one collected with initial authentication method (i.e. social login), WiFi network administrator can simply enable custom form authentication, which consists on asking the users to fill in a custom form to complete the login, as seen on the image below of the Tanaza splash page editor’s Advanced Settings for Facebook Social Login.

This pre-filled form-based authentication is a handy captive portal configuration in public networks located in places like retail stores, supermarkets or educational institutes. By requesting a student number or a fidelity card number, the WiFi network administrator can be offer targeted discounts and share information tailored to the user. What is more, this tool can also serve as a verification system in order to identify that the user is a real user, using their personal phone number.

 

Thanks to the data retrieved from the WiFi user’s social profile (if its privacy setting allows that) and the information collected using the custom form, WiFi professionals can run various types of targeted marketing campaigns.

 

Check out a short GIF of the login process below:

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Users can now see their WiFi voucher usage data

Thanks to Tanaza’s captive portal, WiFi network administrators can enable multiple authentication methods for users to log into a public network.  WiFi vouchers is just one of the many authentication available.

Recently, Tanaza’s couponing system feature was updated so that WiFi network administrators could enable users to see details regarding the usage of their WiFi vouchers once they’ve logged in to the network using a coupon code.

The couponing system feature allows network administrators to distribute WiFi vouchers to configure a coupon template, set a data limit, a quota limit, a duration, add an expiration date, and enable the “stop and resume” option. Thanks to the latest update of the feature, the network administrator can now also choose whether or not to show its WiFi user detailed data about their voucher usage.

 

view voucher usage dataEnable coupon data usage on your splash page

In order to use this latest update and share data with the users, the WiFi network administrator must enabled this update within the couponing system feature. Once enabled and the user authenticates using the WiFi voucher, they are shown detailed data about their voucher usage, such as:

  • Voucher name
  • Total session time available
  • Consumed session time
  • Download quota
  • Upload quota
  • Number of devices connected

 

>> See how to enable this update on your SSID

 

Furthermore, This feature can be leveraged for both new WiFi users and for returning WiFi users, thanks to Tanaza’s remember me feature that automatically logs in users who have previously logged on to the network.

 

Practical cases for this feature update:

New users

Once they input the coupon code, new WiFi users will be shown the usage data (if enabled) the network administrator chooses to display and will then be redirected to a landing page.

Returning users (with welcome back splash page)

The Tanaza remember me feature allows returning users to automatically login to a WiFi network without the authentication process. A welcome back splash page will be displayed (as seen in the image above) automatically showing data about the voucher previously used to authenticate,  the returning user will be able to see usage data,such as session time and the remaining upload and download quota. The welcome back splash page will not require re-authentication and will give users the option to choose when to connect by simply clicking on the connect button which will redirect them to a landing page, or to request to be forgotten if they wish to use another login method or another coupon to access the network.